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source: tate.org.uk via: pantyhouse

piratedistributing:

Pestilence: Death of The First Born

1805

William Blake

magictransistor:

Edvard Munch. Woodcuts. Woman’s Head Against the Shore, Melancholy II, Evening Melancholy II, Woman on the Shore II, Encounter in Space, Woman on the Shore I, Two Human Beings The Lonely Ones, Manbathing, The Girls on the Bridge, Towards the Forest II (top to bottom). 1890s-1920.

les-sources-du-nil:

Man Ray

"Space Writing" (Self Portrait), 1935

(Bowdoin College Museum of Art)

source: maxgehr via: keplyq

mymodernmet:

20-year-old Romanian photographer Felicia Simion's “dreamscapes” follow silhouetted figures in their journeys across vast, mysterious landscapes. Check out our exclusive interview with her, here.

imagine you knew a real human being

imagine you knew a real human being who only ever said short jokes about popular topics.

imagine you knew a real human being who only ever told you how fucked your worldview really is.

imagine you knew a real human being who only ever talked about the unbearable sadness of existence.

imagine you knew a real human being who only ever showed you pictures of domesticated animals.

imagine you knew a real human being who only ever pointed out the stupidity and failures of others.

imagine you knew a real human being who only ever spoke in random non-sequiturs that were nevertheless formulaic and contrived.

imagine you knew a real human being who only ever told you to imagine real human beings who only ever communicated in a certain kind of way.

imagine you knew a real human being who only ever spoke deep poetic truths eliciting a sense of wonder and mystical communion with all being.

imagine you knew a real human being who only ever existed in real life instead of merely being a digital simulacrum of a real human being.

imagine you knew a real human being who only ever imagined knowing hypothetical real human beings.

imagine you knew a real human being.

teainfusion:

“King Pig Turned Flowers into Language. This Was Later Seen as a Mistake”
by John Lurie (20”x14”, watercolor and ink on paper, © 2014)